Readings & Conversations Archive

Displaying 171 - 180 of 887

March 24, 2011

Zbigniew Herbert
March 24, 2011

Renowned poets provide insight into the poetry of Polish master Zbigniew Herbert (1924–1998) and discuss his witty, probing essays on travel, classical literature and visual art.

March 18, 2011

Pierre Joris
March 18, 2011

Esteemed poet and translator Pierre Joris discusses Paul Celan (1920-1970), the German-speaking Jewish poet whose writings transformed post-World War II poetry.

March 17, 2011

Georg Trakl on stamp
March 17, 2011

A World War I medical officer and brilliant poet whose work attracted the patronage of Wittgenstein, Georg Trakl (1887–1914) and his sinister, imagistic poems are taken up by three

March 05, 2011

Jen Bervin
March 05, 2011

Part of the Annual Chapbook Festival, Wednesday, March 2–Saturday, March 5

February 08, 2011

Elizabeth Bishop
February 08, 2011

This tribute to Elizabeth Bishop's 100th birthday features readings from her poetry and selections from Elizabeth Bishop and The New Yorker, a new volume of Bishop's correspondence.

January 29, 2011

Daniela Gioseffi
January 29, 2011

Poet and editor Daniela Gioseffi traces transcendentalist themes in American poetry, from Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson to Langston Hughes, June Jordan and Mary Oliver.

January 23, 2011

Christian Bök and Stephen Collis
January 23, 2011

Leading Canadian poets at the cutting edge of contemporary practice address the history of sound poetry and performance, multilingualism, activism and other topics.

January 22, 2011

Fred Wah and M NourbeSe Philip
January 22, 2011
Leading Canadian poets at the cutting edge of contemporary practice address the history of sound poetry and performance, multilingualism, activism and other topics.

November 20, 2010

Daniel Swift
November 20, 2010

Daniel Swift, the author of Bomber County: The Poetry of a Lost Pilot's War and a professor of English at Skidmore College, examines poems written in response to the bombi

November 18, 2010

November 18, 2010

National Book Award–winning poet Gerald Stern— described as “a postnuclear, multicultural Whitman for the millennium” (Kate

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