Between "Soft" and "Hard" Clocks: A Meditation on Temporality with Erica Hunt

Poet, essayist, and teacher Erica Hunt considers five poems and how they frame time: tense, tempo, slippage, archive, and prophecy. Author of several books of poetry, including Time Slips Right Before the Eyes, Local History, ARCADE and Piece Logic, she is also co-editor of Letters to the Future: Radical Writing by Black Women with Dawn Lundy Martin. She is the Parsons Family University Professor of Creative Writing at Long Island University, Brooklyn campus.

Passwords: Danez Smith on Audre Lorde

Finalist for the National Book Award and Lambda Award-winner Danez Smith discusses the life and work of legendary poet and activist Audre Lorde (1934–1992), whose radical poetics broke new ground in addressing racism, sexism, class inequity, and homophobia.

The Archive as Resistance: A Craft Talk with Cynthia Cruz

The author of four books and winner of the Hodder Fellowship, among other honors, poet and critic Cynthia Cruz discusses creative engagement with archives as a means of social resistance and aesthetic experimentation, offering examples from visual art, including experimental film; contemporary poetry; and her own practice.

Presented as part of the Emerging Poets Fellowship public lecture series, with support from the Jerome Foundation.

Best American Poetry: 30 Years with Mark Doty, Terrance Hayes, Natasha Trethewey and Others

The acclaimed annual anthology series Best American Poetry celebrates three decades of publication with readings of selections by several of its editors, who are among the most renowned poets in the country.

Poets House at AWP in Tampa, Florida

On the occasion of Poets House’s 30th Anniversary, three award-winning poets, representing the rich diversity of contemporary American poetry, read from their work and discuss the role of poetry in our culture.

Admission free for registered Association of Writers & Writing Programs Conference (AWP) participants; for details, please visit the AWP website

The City with Rigoberto Gonzalez

Lambda Award-winning poet Rigoberto González considers five poems that explore the city. As the bittersweet symbol of order and chaos, progress and decay, community and overcrowding, the city is both beacon and demon—a landscape of possibility where dreams are born and where dreams transform or die. González examines a range of poetic representations of the city and civilization and how, over centuries, these urban spaces continue to mirror human joy and anxiety. These poems help us understand the powers of the city—the greatest archive of memory, history and story.

Diamond Mountains: Poets Respond to Korean Art

Poets Amanda Calderon and Michael Leong read works in response to The Met’s exhibition Diamond Mountains: Travel and Nostalgia in Korean Art, featuring artwork from the 18th century to the present inspired by what may be the most famous and emotionally resonant site on the Korean peninsula—The Diamond Mountains. The region’s location in what is today North Korea has kept it largely inaccessible in modern times.

Writing the Body with Kimiko Hahn

What does text look like if a writer is “writing the body”? Poet Kimiko Hahn considers this, using as a starting place écriture féminine—the French feminist movement of the 1970s that defined writing as, in the words of scholar Elaine Showalter, “inscription of the feminine body and female difference in language and text.” Hahn explores the concept of a “full throated” poetry of physicality in the work of writers like Emily Dickinson, Gertrude Stein, Sylvia Plath, Lucille Clifton, Joy Harjo, and Claudia Rankine.

Poetry & The Body with Chia-Lun Chang, Alex Cuff, Rico Frederick, Ricardo Hernandez, Cynthia Manick and Adeeba Talukder

Graduates of Poets House’s Emerging Poets Fellowship read new work composed on the theme of the body as inspired by experiences working in the Poets House archives.

Presented as part of Where My Dreaming and My Loving Live: Poetry & The Body, the second annual initiative of the Poetry Coalition, a national poetry coalition working together to promote the value poets bring to our culture and the important contribution poetry makes in the lives of people of all ages and backgrounds.

Writing & Teaching in a Time of Crisis: Lessons from June Jordan

During her life, poet and essayist June Jordan (1936 – 2002) energetically responded to the crises of the disenfranchised with activism, writing and teaching. To continue her legacy of speaking truth to power, poets Joshua Bennett, Suzanne Gardinier, Donna Masini and Aja Monet talk about their own experiences with writing and teaching in our current time of crisis.

Presented with the support of the June M. Jordan Literary Estate.

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