Branching Out New Orleans: Robert Pinsky on Robert Frost and William Carlos Williams

Robert Frost and William Carlos Williams have far more in common than their adherents sometimes acknowledge. The shared territory includes their interest in American idiom, and what Frost calls "sentence sounds," as fundamental. Beyond that profound matter of speech at the heart of poetry—and American speech at the heart of their artistic enterprise—Frost and Williams both struggle with the tangled, aspiring, somewhat demented project of American memory.

Poetry in The Branches Reading: Patricia Smith

Beginning in February 2005, Staten Island teens and adults will be doing what Poetry in The Branches was designed for: bumping into poetry and discovering its delights. The pilot year of this program will see Staten Island branches of The New York Public Library hosting six poetry-writing workshops for teens, and, for adults, a series of readings by stellar poets of their own and their favorite poets’ work. On a Spring afternoon or evening, when a trip on the ferry adds an extra note of pleasure to your day, come hear these readings.

"Mapmaking & Wayfinding" with Brian Blanchfield

This workshop will focus on the generation of new poems with the obliging qualities of good maps—their sense of potential, their purposiveness, their capaciousness— supplemented by reading assignments of Anne Carson, Hart Crane, C. S. Giscombe, Adrienne Rich, Lisa Robertson, Cole Swenson, and others.

Poetry in The Branches Reading: Quincy Troupe

Beginning in February 2005, Staten Island teens and adults will be doing what Poetry in The Branches was designed for: bumping into poetry and discovering its delights. The pilot year of this program will see Staten Island branches of The New York Public Library hosting six poetry-writing workshops for teens, and, for adults, a series of readings by stellar poets of their own and their favorite poets’ work. On a Spring afternoon or evening, when a trip on the ferry adds an extra note of pleasure to your day, come hear these readings.

Poetry in the Children's Room: Everything Sings, Everything Dances

A sharing of poems celebrating the marvel that is Spring. We’ll make our own books of poems to be hung from the ever-blossoming, ever-growing branches of our thoughts.

Branching Out Kansas City: Eamon Grennan on Emily Dickinson

"This talk, 'Identity to Seek: The Selves of Emily,' engages with a number of the poems of Emily Dickinson, in order to think about her as a poet who reveals to us, in her nature as a fragmented or multiple self, something about what lyric poetry is and means. I connect her work with some of the remarks Keats makes about the character of the poet, as well as placing her in a lyric context containing such poets as Yeats, Whitman, and Stevens.

Branching Out Milwaukee: Eamon Grennan on Emily Dickinson

"This talk, 'Identity to Seek: The Selves of Emily,' engages with a number of the poems of Emily Dickinson, in order to think about her as a poet who reveals to us, in her nature as a fragmented or multiple self, something about what lyric poetry is and means. I connect her work with some of the remarks Keats makes about the character of the poet, as well as placing her in a lyric context containing such poets as Yeats, Whitman, and Stevens.

Stanley's Century: Celebrating Stanley Kunitz's 100th Birthday

More than a dozen poets and artists gather to celebrate the achievement of Stanley Kunitz as poet, editor, teacher, activist, community leader, collaborator, and friend. Their readings and remarks about his life, work, and times will offer a unique glimpse into this legendary figure of twentieth-century American letters.

Branching Out Fresno: Eavan Boland on William Butler Yeats

Looking at Yeats, though the lens of his finished poems, he can seem a historic poet, almost cast in marble. In fact Yeats was a turbulent, troubled young man who became a passionate and sorrowful older one. His love poems show that. His poems of Ireland show it too. His beautiful language, far from being a monument, is a fever chart of the intensity and hunger with which he lived his life. Ireland and a desperate, unrequited love affair drove his poetry, some of which is the greatest of the twentieth century. So did his fear of old age and his fury at the modern world.

Pages

Subscribe to Poets House RSS