Collaborations with Jen Bervin

Open to writers and artists, this workshop familiarizes students with the vast history of visual-verbal collaboration from the Middle Ages to the present and prepares participants to undertake a series of remarkable joint projects.

Branching Out NYC: Susan Stewart on Anna Akhmatova

By considering the Russian poet Anna Akhmatova's (1889-1966) progression from love lyrics to political sequences, Stewart demonstrates the capacity of poets to reflect the temporary conditions of their societies and to create permanent values through their labor of memory and imagination.

Branching Out Milwaukee: E. Ethelbert Miller on Langston Hughes

What are Langston's lessons? An examination of the work of Langston Hughes will help you learn more about America. It will help you explore the tough tapestry of race. His work will make you look into the mirror and see yourself. Are you ready? Who was this man who taught us how to dream? The life and work of Langston Hughes echoes the social transformation of America from the 1920s to the early 1960s. How did he put blues and jazz into his words? What was his secret? Come dance with the dreamer and discover how he changed literature.

The Quality of Being Present with Scott Hightower

This workshop explores what Charles Baudelaire once called the "quality of being present." Through in-depth discussions, exercises and the analysis of exemplary poems, students explore different ways of sharing their observations, effectively and clearly, and discover the specific qualities of their own poetics.

Poetry in the Children's Room: Once Around the Sun and Other Travels with Bobbi Katz

Bobbi Katz, the author of A Rumpus of Rhymes: A Book of Noisy Poems and editor of the award-winning Pocket Poems, will read from her latest book, Once Around the Sun, and be our travel guide as we write and share verse-voyages.

Branching Out Little Rock: Carl Phillips on Walt Whitman

In his talk, Carl Phillips will explore the ways in which Whitman is among the first to stake out forbidden territory (race, masculinity, morality) for American poetry and to find a form that persuasively enacts the poem's content. He will also consider the ways in which Whitman's poems continue to have a contemporary resonance and to illustrate what it has meant and continues to mean, on so many levels, to be American, for better and for worse.

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