And Death Shall Have No Dominion

And Death Shall Have No Dominion is a participatory singing event for a synchronized headphone choir in honor of Dylan Thomas’s famous poem. Using an app that contains the accompaniment and synchronizes their mobile devices, participants set-off along 45-minute walking routes through lower Manhattan, singing the words of the renowned poet across the landscape of his final days.

In Conversation: Maria Hassabi, Paolo Javier, and Kaneza Schaal

In conjunction with the site-based presentation of Maria Hassabi’s dance performance PREMIERE at Bowling Green, join Maria Hassabi, Paolo Javier, and Kaneza Schaal in a conversation about the role of and relationship between word, image, and movement across disciplines. Each artist, working in dance, poetry, and theater respectively, blurs lines between disciplines in varying ways.

Ubiquitous Dividend: A Day-long celebration of Robert Kocik’s 'Supple Science'

Workshop: 2:00–5:00pm
Performance: 6:00–8:00pm

Poets House presents an afternoon workshop and concert celebrating the works of poet and prosodist Robert Kocik through a variety of disciplines—poetics, visual art, performance, architecture, disability studies, design, medicine, economics, and politics—to explore what Kocik calls the “sore, over-sensitive, insecure, and supple sciences.” This event is also the release of Supple Science: A Robert Kocik Primer, recently published by ON Contemporary Practice.

Literary Partners Program: Mr. Hip Presents Poetry Series

Please join Boston's Most Interactive and Engaging Poetry, Spoken Word, Live Music, and Art Series for a night of poetry and music in NYC.

Hosted by Mr. Hip, readers include:
Ishion Hutchinson (Virtually)
Lisa Marie Basile
Leah Umansky
Jasmine Dreame Wagner
Ashleigh Lambert
ELLA
Ian Blake
Joe Sonnenblick

With music by jazz band, The Jordan Carter Trio

2014: Emerging Poets Fellowship Reading (Full Audio)

An energetic reading to celebrate the dynamic emerging voices in this year’s Emerging Poets Fellowship: Wo Chan, Stephen Boyer, Lara Weibgen, Maxe Crandall, J.

Literary Partners Program: Red Mountain Press Reading

Please join Red Mountain Press for an evening with poets Ann Filemyr, Susan Gardner, and Donald Levering

Reception and book sale to follow.

About the poets:

This Condensary: Short Poems with Brian Teare

This class will focus on reading and writing short poems, particularly those of ten lines or less. We will look at the structure of short poems from around the world and from throughout the histories of poetry, including Classical epigrams, haiku, and Imagist lyric; discussing Catullus, Basho, and H. D., among others. Throughout our discussions and writing we’ll focus on the formal strategies—prosody, syllable count, rhyme, alliteration, image, etc.— and the kinds of detail work that allow a successful short poem to grow ever larger in our minds after we’re done reading it.

Crossing the Line with Priscilla Becker

Lineation is the main design, the central idiosyncratic feature of poetry. This class stems from connections to other precincts of lineation, primarily geology: the linear structural features within rocks, called intersection, crenulation, mineral, and stretching. The re-navigation of the poetic line into the metamorphic lineation of geology is a re- orientation. Our writing exercises will emanate from this interdisciplinary crossroad, employing such inventions as junction, stress, re-direction, and parallelism.

The Poetry of Form: Physical Structures in the History of Verse with Regan Good

T S Eliot wrote, “To use very strict form is a help, because you concentrate on the technical difficulties of mastering the form, and allow the content of the poem a more unconscious and freer release.” A poetic form is a little recipe, an algorithm in the history of verse. There is nothing poetic about form itself. How does one enable the content—the poetry—to flow within the strictures of a sonnet, or a sestina, or a villanelle? How does poetry result from rules and confinement? We will discuss forms and write our own poems within and outside them.

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